Scientists in South Korea have created new "e-tattoos" that can track health issues

According to South Korean experts, silvery butterflies or other designs etched on the skin with this "electronic tattoo ink" comprised of liquid metal and carbon nanotubes can assist monitor heart rates and other crucial health indications.

The technology's developers from the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) acknowledge that it is still in its infancy. more...

The e-tattoo represents the direction of medical technology

While providing essential monitoring, medical gadgets like pacemakers, insulin pumps, and cardiac monitors can sometimes cause interference. The most recent medical wearables, however, are so light and flexible that patients may not even be aware they are wearing them. more...

"E-Tattoo" to measure blood pressure

Measuring blood pressure is a routine part of many people's lives - both in terms of prevention and treatment of various diseases. Researchers in Texas have now developed a method of measuring blood pressure continuously and on the move: With the help of an electrical "tattoo," blood pressure is recorded using the principle of bioimpedance. more...

Development of an electronic tattoo for blood pressure measurement

Researchers at Texas A&M and the University of Texas at Austin used an electronic typewriter to measure primary pressure.

The feature works without the aid of additional tools and is more accurate than other reading tests such as compact mirrors and wallets.

The smart type, which is also designed to place the kit, is made of graphene and is equipped with "invisible" miniature sensors for data reporting, data and so on. more...

Electronic tattoo to enable blood pressure measurements

Researchers have developed an electronic tattoo that continuously measures blood pressure. It is expected to surpass all previous systems in accuracy.

Technology has been a game changer in medicine for years. While in our everyday lives we mainly see advances in technical devices and applications, artificial intelligence (AI) is also gradually moving into many hospitals and medical practices. more...

Electronic tattoo monitors body functions

Flexible electronics with sensors, solar cells and radio module adheres securely and imperceptibly to the skin

Urbana (USA)/Singapore - Without any adhesive, a versatile and flexible sensor module adheres to the skin and permanently measures important bodily functions. This adhesive tattoo, which is much thinner than a sheet of paper and only the size of a postage stamp, was developed by an international team of researchers. In addition to flexible electrical conductors, the scientists integrated sensors for heartbeat and brain waves, light-emitting diodes, a radio module and even tiny solar cells to generate electricity. In addition, the module can be supplied with energy via electromagnetic waves - similar to radio tags for expensive products. The researchers present their prototype, which sticks securely to the skin for up to 24 hours, in the journal Science. more...

Medical research: Measuring blood pressure with an electronic tattoo

An electronic tattoo made of graphene is said to help measure blood pressure. A team from Texas has tested the scientific method.


A research team from the Universities of Texas at Austin and Texas A&M has developed an electronic tattoo that can provide continuous blood pressure measurements. Its accuracy is said to surpass options available on the market.more...

Electronic tattoo monitors the heart

The flexible electronic tattoo (e-tattoo) is worn on the chest and detects both a conventional electrocardiogram (ECG) and a seismocardiograph (SCG) reading.


With an e-tattoo (electronic tattoo) worn directly on the chest, heart health can be determined in two ways. First, the electronic tattoo records the electrocardiogram (ECG). It is also possible to obtain the lesser known seismocardiograph reading (SCC). The e-Tattoo was developed by researchers at the University of Texas Cockrell School of Engineering in Austin. When used in conjunction with ECG and chest vibration data, it can better assess the accuracy of ECG data. more...