We are living in a phase of technological upheaval: within just a few years, the computer and the Internet have completely transformed the way we live and work. Find out here which of the new technologies are really important and why they will shape our everyday lives in the future.


Many people have tattoos, and they find them fashionable and attractive. Modern tattoo artists create real masterpieces on the skin that look amazing. But drawing a picture with ink is only an adornment of your body if you do not consider it a sacred meaning or a way of expressing your principles. A tattoo is beautiful, but to be honest, it has no practical use. Another thing is electronics tattoos. more...

Today, tattoos are no longer just a symbol of rebellion or belonging to the criminal part of society. They are used for medical purposes. Electronic ink tattoos can track the patient's state and provide psychological support after complex surgeries. Soon, drawings on the body will not be just an accessory but move into the category of fashionable gadgets like smartwatches and fitness trackers. In this article, we will talk about how digital camo tattoos became a part of medicine. more...



TU Graz researcher Francesco Greco developed ultra-light tattoo electrodes that are barely noticeable on the skin, making long-term measurements of brain activity cheaper and easier. more...

However, Germans do not yet seem to be truly convinced about autonomous driving. According to surveys, 45 percent of drivers do not believe in the reliability of vehicle technology or are afraid of hackers. Digital euphoria looks different. more...

Assisted driving is already a reality in many cars today. For example, cruise control ensures that the selected speed is maintained, and automatic adaptive cruise control (ACC) brakes or accelerates the car depending on the distance to the car or truck in front. In this way, it ensures that the safe distance is not undercut. The automatic Lane Keeping Assistant System (LKAS) is also becoming increasingly common. more...

We usually use plasters to protect wounds from dirt. But the adhesive strips can serve completely different purposes on the skin: Plasters can be equipped to warn us, for example, when we drink too much alcohol, when we have a fever, or when our blood sugar is too low. Some adhesive tattoos are so intelligent that they also release active ingredients when the body needs them. But how does that work? And what modern options are already available? more...

Computer scientists at Saar University and the U.S. company Google are giving wrinkles, knuckles and birthmarks a completely new meaning. Similar to chewing gum tattoos for children, researchers apply ultra-thin, electronic tattoos to prominent areas of the body. more...

Electronic tattoos: health monitor printed on the skin


US scientists have developed a novel electronic tattoo that monitors body values

A team of researchers in the laboratory of materials scientist John Rogers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign has developed so-called "epidermal electronics" that can be applied to the body's skin like removable tattoos. more...

Scientists working with John Rogers at the University of Illinois in Urbana have developed an electronic foil that adheres like an adhesive tattoo and stretches on the skin without affecting its wearer. The device - filled with almost any components - could be used for medical diagnostics, but also as a human-machine interface. more...

You won't find a steering wheel, accelerator pedal or foot brake in the self-driving car visions from GM and Ford. Will cars without human controls soon be rolling along the roads? more...

VW's software subsidiary Cariad and automotive supplier Bosch want to jointly develop software for automated driving. The first functions are to be included in new cars as early as next year. more...

What is commonplace on some U.S. highways will soon be seen more often on German roads: self-driving cars. Autonomous driving is also the focus of the ITS World Congress, which begins today in Hamburg. more...